Rosé : a wine for all seasons no matter the weather

BY Anna
October 3, 2015

October 3, 2015 Rosé : a wine for all seasons no matter the weather

BY Anna

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]In the US, rosé is traditionally associated with the summer: barbecues, al fresco picnics and long warm evenings are the perfect settings for a glass of chilled pink wine. We all feel the allure of a refreshing glass of rosé when the sun comes out, and pink feels like an appropriately frivolous color for a time of fun and relaxation. Rosé is the perfect drink for hot weather, with its lightness and flavors of summer fruits like strawberries and raspberries.

rose-year-roundHowever, rosé is increasingly being drunk year-round and there are many factors which make it an appropriate and pleasant choice for autumn and winter as well as for the warmer months. In France, where many of the best rosé regions are located, it is drunk in all seasons and in fact the French now consume more rosé than white wine. The fuller body and fruity notes usually associated with red wine are combined with the refreshing crispness of a good white, making rosé extremely versatile and perfect for pairing with a range of more wintery foods.

Many wine makers are now emphasizing the multi-seasonal appeal of rosé. Provence’s Chateau de Pinarbon has recently announced that it will be releasing a new limited-edition rosé cuvée, aimed at year-round drinking, which they hope to market to traditional red and white wine drinkers. It is a wine with a carefully crafted structure and therefore benefits from a slightly longer aging period. It is presented as a more ‘gourmet’ rosé option which lends itself to autumn and winter consumption.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]For many people nowadays, as Robin Raisfield and Rob Patronite of New York Magazine point out, ‘rosé is less fashionable summertime prop than versatile food wine, with the refreshing acidity of a white and a modicum of the rich fruit and tannic structure of a red.’ They nod to a new trend for upmarket US sommeliers and restaurateurs to include a selection of ‘winter rosés’ on their wine lists, leaning towards those with a deeper color and a more full-bodied flavor.

For a delicious drink in cooler weather, choose rosés which contain notes of the more wintery fruits and spices: they can be perfect for pairing with a range of autumnal foods. For example, a 2012 Chateau de Selle Rosé Coeur de Grain by Domaines Ott has a nose evocative of summery peach and lemon, but is balanced with notes of cinnamon and vanilla. For a more fruity wine, the 2014 L’Art Provençal Rosé offers rich aromas of red currant, plum and cassis, with a wild herb finish. Alternatively, pulling out a good bottle of rosé is the perfect excuse to turn up the heating and let your thoughts drift back to warmer weather, barbecues and sunny evenings![/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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